A Sunday in Tokyo

Compared to the staid and professional financial district of Otemachi where I had spent much of the week, Shibuya on a Sunday afternoon was a fizzing hive of youthful energy and activity.

Arriving at Shibuya via the efficient metro system, I first attempted to photograph the famous crossing, with (initially) limited success. I had read there was a Starbucks overlooking the crossing, although it is actually part of a multi-storey record store with a vast inventory of CDs and vinyl records, the like of which I thought been consigned to history. As promised, there was bar seating next to the huge windows although every seat was full, not of the gawping tourists that I aspired to be, but mostly students, either alone with laptops or chatting with a friend. There was also a huge queue for a coffee so I left and instead enjoyed a very good pasta lunch at a window table in Café L’Occitane just around the corner while capturing a time-lapse video of the crossing.

After exploring some uniquely Japanese shops such as Tokyu Hands and Mega Don Quijote, I walked into an adjacent area and enjoyed a coffee break at Lonely Planet recommended Fuglen. This may be a Norwegian coffee chain by origin but the coffee was good, and clearly adopted as the neighbourhood hangout by the locals.

After dinner, another Lonely Planet recommendation allowed me to capture some sunset photos of Shibuya from the 9th floor of a nearby arts centre/theatre building. The final photo of the three below was captured near the more serene Imperial Palace.

The joy of a window seat on a fine day

I chose a window seat for my first plane trip in over two years and I was not disappointed. After taking off from Heathrow we turned to the east and traced the route of the Thames to the sea. The summer weather meant there were crystal clear views of the green and pleasant land south of London, bisected by the M25!

After flying over Kent, the picturesque coast of France came into view, along with the busy shipping lane that is the English Channel–I had forgotten just how captivating it can be to study the earth below—no reading book or other entertainment was needed for the first thirty or so minutes of the flight. A few hours later I saw some astonishing cloud formations over Germany, and then at the end of the journey I was treated to my first views of Tokyo.

On this Day: Samoëns 2020

January 2020—a month late for “On this Day” but I wanted to try out the newly release Luminar Neo and realised I had never posted any photographs from this trip.

First impressions of Luminar Neo upgrading from Luminar 4 are that it is a completely new program and consequently as a 1.0 release there are a number of features from Luminar 4 are not implemented yet. There is also (yet another) new interface which will take some getting used to. Skylum have promised frequent releases so I expect the gap will close shortly—for now I will be sticking with Luminar 4.

Merry Christmas

With few opportunities for great adventures, 2021 has been a quiet year on this blog. However my camera did get a run out on Christmas Day, and so I thought I would post some food photography to wish everyone a Merry Christmas and Happy New Year. Here’s to more adventures in 2022.

Lockdown Entertainment: Cheese Night!

Working from home and eating dinner with the little ones at 5pm means I am often foraging in the cupboards for an evening snack. I remembered reading sometime last year that cheese is one of the many culinary experiences you can have delivered to your doorstep and decided to break up the monotony of lockdown with an Introduction Box from The Cheese Collective.

The website ordering process was slick and efficient, and allowed me to state whether I want to exclude blue cheeses and goats’ cheese–handy if you are put off trying traditional selection boxes because of the risk that you will definitely not like a significant proportion of it. The Cheese Collective supply only British cheeses, although the supplied little tasting cards note to which well-known cheese it is similar. The cheeses I received hailed from Hampshire, Scotland, and Somerset—all fantastic classic cheeses from small producers. This is perhaps not the box to try if you are looking for something with more je ne sais quoi.

On This Day: Skagway and the White Pass Scenic Railway

18th September 2010: overnight our floating hotel had conveyed us to another beautiful harbour, the town of Skagway (population 968). Our morning began with the walk around the preserved and restored Klondike gold rush era central business district, learning about the history and conditions of frontier life.

Later we took a trip on the incredibly scenic White Pass & Yukon Route Railway. This follows the same path as the prospectors up into the mountains, and crosses into the Canadian province of British Columbia. The train continues to the Yukon Territory but we alighted at the customs post in B.C. and enjoyed an exhilarating bicycle free-wheel back down the road to Skagway.

On This Day: Tracy Arm Fjord and Juneau

The 17th September 2010 was our first day in Alaska, the previous one being spent at sea cruising up from Vancouver. The first item on the itinerary was to cruise into the majestic Tracy Arm Fjord in glorious sunshine. We later docked in Juneau—the State Capital, which can only be accessed by sea and air—and took an excursion to see Bald Eagles and Humpback Whales.

Trafalgar Square Fountain

Trafalgar Square Fountain

Photographic entertainment while the Little One enjoyed an ice lolly during a day out to see the sights of London. This was taken by resting the camera on my backpack, which was across my lap. I had to do quite a lot of work on the RAW file but the end result is surprisingly good for basically a handheld shot in the middle of the day.

Apple News+ (UK) – A Review

Having caught up on my backlog of reading during lockdown, I decided to accept Apple’s offer of a free trial of their News+ service. The concept seems attractive for someone who would like to read widely without the great investment of time and money needed to take individual subscriptions to many publications. Unfortunately as I near the end of my month-long trial, I do not intend to continue with it.

The News+ “anchor-tenant” for current affairs in the UK is The Times. It had been my expectation that I could open the News+ app every day and peruse a digital newspaper, with all the in-depth articles and quality journalism that one gets that is so often missing from the 24/7 Internet news cycle. However the News+ service just seemed to give me access to a selection of online stories from The Times, with little to differentiate this offering from non-News+ providers such as The Evening Standard, The Independent or BBC News.

Some of these aforementioned providers have very aggressive advertising on their websites so even an advert-free reading experience would have potentially been a benefit, except News+ continues to display adverts, mostly terrible ones, in a way that seemed to maximise the interruption to the reading experience. In contrast, The Guardian app has the option to remove all adverts for £5.99 per month.

News+ also offer a selection of electronic magazines on a wide variety of topics. Some of these magazines are natively formatted for the app which offers a pleasing reading experience on screens both large and small (such as a phone). Sadly the majority I am interested in are just PDFs. Many local libraries (including my own) already offer free access to e-magazine services that include what are termed digital replicas of paper magazines so there is little incentive to subscribe just for the magazines.